ASU My Future

Traditions

Here is a crash course in some Angelo State University traditions to help you feel connected to campus.

  • Dominic

    DominicA purebred Rambouillet ram, Dominic stands as a proud symbol of ASU and the institution’s ties to the region and its people. He is a regular fixture at ASU activities, ranging from the official Ring Ceremony to outdoor athletic events.

    Graduating students touch their rings to Dominic’s horns for strength or rub them through his wool for luck. During football games, opposing players more than once have run out of bounds near Dominic. The headstrong mascot with his stern glare and his sweeping horns usually sends them back to their teammates.

  • Gum Tree

    Gum TreeASU’s “gum tree” stands as one of the stickiest traditions among all collegiate rituals anywhere. The gum tree is actually a mesquite speckled with thousands of pieces of used chewing gum.

    Located at the southwest corner of the Porter Henderson Library, the tree elicits reactions that range from “yuck” to “cool.” Legend has it that a gum-chewing suitor placed his chaw there prior to asking his girlfriend to marry him. When she said yes, the happy young man attributed his good luck to his gum deposit. Since then, hundreds of students have left their chewing gum on the mesquite to bring them good luck on tests and in life.

    As a result of drought conditions in the summer of 2011, the gum tree uprooted and toppled over under the weight of the gum. Maintenance crews secured the stump in its original location, and the power of the tree is once again at work – it has shown signs of new growth.

  • Ram Jam

    Ram JamPrior to Rams home football games every fall, you can find tailgaters gathered in the LeGrand Alumni and Visitors Center parking lot as early as noon grilling barbecue and other tasty treats. Alumni and students started the tradition because they wanted a place to have fun before each kickoff.

    A typical Ram Jam includes performances from local bands, bounce houses for children, and free food and refreshments that are typically prepared by the ASU Alumni Grill Team or a local sponsor. As game time nears, the ASU Ram Band, the Angelettes and the cheerleaders perform for the crowd and then lead the group in a procession from the LeGrand Center to San Angelo Stadium.

  • Ram’s Head

    Ram's HeadJust as other universities have their own spirit hand signs, so does Angelo State University with the Ram’s Head.

    The sign is made by bending the middle and ring fingers down over the palm and covering them with the thumb. The extended index and pinky fingers are then bent halfway to represent the curve of the horns.

    You will see the sign used at various times during athletic events and always during the playing of the Alma Mater in acknowledgement of the mighty and majestic ram.

  • Roscoe and Bella

    Roscoe and BellaRoscoe and Bella are our furry friends with unmatched ASU school spirit. Seen at most athletic events and many community activities, Roscoe and Bella let their actions do their talking, whether it is leading cheers, handing out candy to children or greeting freshmen when they arrive on campus.

  • Victory Line

    Victory LineStudents and Rams fans form the victory line at the start of the second half of each regular-season football game at San Angelo Stadium. At the end of the halftime show, fans are invited to come down on the field and form two parallel lines of spectators for the football team to run between as they return to the home bench. Led by the cheerleaders, Roscoe and Bella, the team rushes onto the field to the applause and cheers of their fans.